6 Ways to Ask for a Phone Number in Spanish


Nowadays, phones are an essential part of our communication, for that reason, it’s important that you know how to ask for a phone number in Spanish. In order to help you with this, we’ve compiled a list of 6 different ways to ask someone for their phone number. 

All of the expressions listed below are very common in all Spanish speaking countries. However, since some of them may be more appropriate for either a formal or casual context, make sure you read the descriptions and the examples carefully. 

By the end of this article, you’ll be able to ask for a phone number in Spanish in different situations. 

1. ¿Cuál es tu número? – What’s your phone number?

¿Cuál es tu número? is a very casual way to ask someone for their number. This expression is the shortened version of the phrase ¿cuál es tu número de teléfono?. Even though both phrases have the same meaning and purpose, we use them in different contexts:

‘¿Cuál es tu número?’ is very straightforward, as a result, it’s more suitable for casual conversations or for situations where you and the other person are familiar with each other. This expression can be translated as ‘what’s your number?’. 

On the other hand, ‘¿cuál es tu número de teléfono?’ is a more polite and slightly formal way to ask someone for their number. This expression is the direct translation of ‘what’s your phone number?’ and it can be used in both formal and informal situations. 

Here is a common phrase structure that you can use in this situation. Notice that if needed, you can mention whose number you are looking for. 

¿Cuál es + [article/possessive pronoun] + número + (de) + (person)?

Oye, Paty, ¿cuál es tu número?
Hey, Paty, what’s your number?

Andrea, ¿cuál es el número de tu hermana?
Andrea, what’s your sister’s phone number?

¿Alguien sabe cuál es el número de teléfono de Rebecca?
Does anybody know what Rebecca’s phone number is?

Take Note: You can also use any of these expressions to ask for a business or place’s phone number. For the purpose of clarity, it’s recommended to include in your statement the place that you’re referring to. 

¿Cuál es + [article/possessive pronoun] + número + [de] + [article] + [place]?

Paul, ¿cuál es el número de la oficina?
Paul, what’s the office number?

¿Cuál es el número de la pizzería?
What’s the number of the pizza place?

2. ¿Me pasas tu teléfono? – Can you give me your number?

In casual and informal conversations, a popular way to ask for a phone number in Spanish is by saying ¿me pasas tu teléfono? Although this is a very common expression, it’s more suitable for situations where you already have some kind of familiarity with the other person. 

Additionally, you could also use it’s variation ¿Me das tu número? Notice that both phrases are addressing ‘tú’, but you can customize this expression if you want to get someone else’s number. Here is how you do it: 

¿[Indirect pronoun] + [pasar conjugated] + teléfono/número + (de) + (person/place)?

¿Me pasas el teléfono de tu hermana?
Can you give your sister’s number?

Caro, ¿le pasas tu teléfono a Richard?
Caro, can you give Richard your number?

Hola, Sandy, ¿me pasas el número de la oficina de David?
Hi, Sandy, can you give me David’s office number?

Justin, ¿me pasas tu teléfono para enviarte la tarea?
Justin, can you give me your number so I can send you the homework?

Take Note: ‘¿Me pasas tu teléfono?’ and ‘¿me pasas tu número?’ are both casual expressions, so if you want them to be more polite and softened, you can add the verb poder to your statement. 

¿Me puedes pasar el número de tu hermana?
Can you give me your sister’s phone number?

Related Resource: How to Place Indirect Pronouns in Spanish

3. ¿Cuál es tu teléfono? – What’s your phone number?

In Spanish, ¿cuál es tu teléfono? is another popular phrase that people use to ask for a phone number. This expression can be used when asking a friend or acquaintances for a number. But it’s also commonly used when a person is requesting your personal information.

In this last case, people may use the form ¿cuál es su teléfono? as an attempt to sound more formal and polite. This expression can be translated as ‘what’s your phone number?’. 

Andy, ¿cuál es tu teléfono?
Andy, what’s your phone number?

Mamá, ¿cuál es el teléfono de mi papá?
Mom, what’s dad’s phone number?

Oye, ¿cuál es el teléfono de mi tía Agatha?
Hey, what’s my Aunt Agatha’s phone number?

Si quieres te puedo marcar al rato, ¿cuál es tu teléfono?
If you want I can call you later, what’s your phone number?

Take Note: In the context of asking for a phone number, both ‘teléfono’ and ‘número’ can be used as a more casual synonym of ‘phone number’. If for some reason you need to be more formal, you can use the full expression número de teléfono.  

4. ¿Puedes darme tu teléfono? – Could you give me your number?

¿Puedes darme tu teléfono? is one of the most polite and standard ways to ask a person for their number in Spanish. Due to its characteristics, this expression can be used in both formal and informal situations. 

Even though this expression is addressing ‘tú’, you can make some adjustments to the following phrase structure to make it match your needs. On top of this, you can also use this expression to ask a business or place’s phone number. 

¿[Indirect pronoun] + [pasar conjugated] + teléfono/número + (de) + (person/place)?

¿Puedes darme tu teléfono? Te marco más tarde
Could you give me your phone number? I’ll call you later

No encuentro mi celular, ¿puedes darme el número de la oficina?
I can’t find my cell phone, could you give me the office phone number?

Yo les hablo para avisarles, Katy, ¿puedes darme tu teléfono?
I’ll call you to let you know, Katy, could you give your phone number?

Me gustaría seguir en contacto contigo, ¿puedes darme tu teléfono?
I would like to keep in touch with you, could you give me your phone number?

Take Note: Remember that in this context, you can use ‘teléfono’ and ‘número’ interchangeably. If you want to be more polite, you can use the full expression ¿me puedes dar tu número de teléfono?

5. ¿Tienes algún número al que te pueda marcar? – Do you have a phone number where I can call you?

¿Tienes algún número al que te pueda marcar? is probably one of the most polite and formal ways to ask people for their number. As a result, this expression is very popular in formal situations where you need to provide your personal information. 

This phrase can also be applied in contexts where you’re still not very familiar with the other person. Additionally, if you want to be a little bit more formal, you will need to make some adjustments to the conjugation and the possessive pronouns: ¿tiene un número al que le pueda marcar?

Variations:

  • ¿Tiene algún número al que nos podamos comunicar? – Do you have a phone number where I can call you?
  • ¿A dónde te marco? – Where should I call you? It’s more appropriate for informal contexts.

Si quieres, te aviso cuando termine, ¿a dónde te macro?
If you want, I’ll let you know when I’m finished, where should I call you?

Para terminar, ¿tiene algún número al que nos podamos comunicar?
Finally, do you have a phone number where I can call you?

Señora, su trámite está listo, ¿tiene algún número al que le pueda marcar?
Madam, your file is ready, do you have a phone number where I can call you?

6. ¿Quieres que intercambiemos números? – Do you want us to exchange numbers?

¿Quieres que intercambiemos números? is a polite and formal way to ask someone for their number at the same time that you offer yours. 

This expression can be applied in business relationships, dates, and acquaintances with whom you don’t have enough familiarity to use a more informal expression. 

¿Quieres que intercambiemos números? Así puedo mandarte estos archivos
Do you want us to exchange numbers? That way I can send you these files

Cuando tenga los papeles, le aviso, ¿quiere que intercambiemos números?
I’ll let you know when I have the papers, do you want us to exchange numbers?

Si quieres, podemos practicar español juntos, ¿quieres que intercambiemos números?
If you want, we practice Spanish together, do you want us to exchange numbers?

Wrapping Up

Knowing how to ask someone for a phone number in Spanish can be very useful and will help you to practice your Spanish skills in real-life situations. 

For that reason, in this article, we’ve compiled a list of the most common expressions that you can use to ask for a phone number in Spanish. 

Even though all of these expressions are very common, keep in mind that some of them will be more suitable for informal or formal situations. Make sure you choose the best option for your case. 

Now, you’re ready to ask for a phone number in Spanish.

Daniela Sanchez

¡Hola! Soy Daniela Sanchez, I’ve taught Spanish in Mexico to a wide array of foreigners. From students and tourists to doctors and soldiers who’ve moved and visited here over the years. During the day I’m a freelancer and marketer, while at night I’m here writing for students of the world wide web looking to learn Spanish. I hope you find what you’re looking here during your journey into Español 🙂 Read More About Me

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