9 Different Ways to Give an Opinion in Spanish


If you’re learning Spanish it is important that you know different structures that allow you to speak your mind and share your opinion about a topic or situation. Knowing how to do this will give you the confidence to interact in different conversations and will help your Spanish fluency. 

For that reason, in this article, we’ve compiled a list of 9 different ways to give an opinion in Spanish. Although all of these phrases are very common, we’ll let you know what’s the best context where you can apply them. 

In addition to this, we’ll provide you with examples and phrase structures so you know how to implement and adjust these expressions to your conversation’s needs. By the end of this, you’ll know the most common ways to say your opinion in Spanish. 

1. En mi opinión – In my opinion

Since En mi opinión is the direct translation of ‘in my opinion’, this phrase is one of the most common ways to give an opinion in Spanish. One of the advantages of this expression is that it can be used in both formal and informal contexts. 

When it comes to using ‘en mi opinión’ there are two phrase structures you can use depending on your situation. The first one is to say your opinion about an object or an event:

[En mi opinión] + [object] + [complement]

En mi opinión, esa película es bastante mala
In my opinion, that movie is pretty bad

No sé qué piensen ustedes, en mi opinión, los boletos están muy caros
I don’t know what you guys think, in my opinion, the tickets are very expensive

With the second option, you can share your opinion about an action. Here is how you do it:

[En mi opinión] + [verb conjugated] + [complement]

En mi opinión, es mejor que hables con tu hermana
In my opinion, it’s better that you speak to your sister

Sé que no me lo preguntaste, pero en mi opinión, deberías tomar el trabajo
I know you didn’t ask me, but in my opinion, you should take the job

Take Note: En mi opinión is used for the first person singular (Yo). Of course, you can use this phrase to express someone else’s opinion, but you’ll need to make some adjustments. 

En + [possessive adjective] + opinión 

En tu opinión, ¿cuál es la mejor película del año?
In your opinion, which is the best movie of the year?

Hablé con Betty, en su opinión, ese restaurante no es muy bueno
I spoke to Betty, in her opinion, that restaurant is not very good

Although ‘en mi opinión’ is very popular, there are other variations that you could find such as Si quieres mi opinión which means if you want my opinion. This expression is more subtle and polite. It can be used to share your opinion even if people haven’t asked it. 

Si quieres mi opinión, deberías aceptar ese trabajo
If you want my opinion, you should take that job

2. Creo que… – I think that

In Spanish, one of the most popular ways to say your opinion is by using ‘Creo que…’. This expression can be translated either as ‘I think that…’ or ‘I believe that…’. However, keep in mind that ‘creo que…’ is not used to talk about beliefs, but rather about opinions. 

Creo que… is very common in casual conversations, but you can also apply it in formal contexts. As you may have noticed, ‘creo que’ is conjugated for ‘Yo’. So if you want to talk about someone else’ opinion, you just need to conjugate ‘creer’ properly. 

Just like with ‘en mi opinion’, there are two phrase structures that you can use: 

[Creer conjugated] + que + [verb conjugated] + complement

Creo que puedes hacer un mejor esfuerzo
I think that you can do a better effort

Si quieres mejorar tu español, creo que tienes que practicar más
If you want to improve your Spanish, I think that you have to practice more

This past structure is perfect to express your opinion about an action. But if instead you want to say what you think about an object, you should use the following structure:

[Creer conjugated] + que + [object/thing] + complement

Pues Sally cree que el examen no estuvo tan difícil
Sally thinks that the test wasn’t that difficult

No sé por qué dices eso, Prissy y yo creemos que esa chava es buena onda
I don’t know why you say that, Prissy and I think that girl is very nice

Variations:

  • Yo pienso que…
  • Yo opino que…

Yo opino que te compres un celular más barato
I think that you should buy a cheaper phone

3. Considero que… – I consider that

If you need to say your opinion in a more formal way, ‘Considero que…’ may be your best option. Due to its formality, this expression can be used in meetings, speeches, school or business environments, books and other formal situations. 

Considero que can be translated as ‘I think that’, or ‘I consider that’, although the latter sounds awkward to say in English. Just like other expressions, you can change the conjugation of the verb considerar to match the person that is sharing her or his opinion. 

[Considerar conjugated] + que + [complement]

Sally considera que debemos aumentar el presupuesto
Sally considers that we should increase the budget

Yo considero que Julia no debió invitar a la señora Ramírez
I think that Julia shouldn’t have invited Mrs. Ramírez

Mis jefes consideran que la calidad de estos productos no es muy buena
My bosses think that the quality of these products is not very good

Take Note: By using a verb immediately after ‘considero que’ you will express your opinion about an action. But if you use a noun after ‘considero que’, you’ll share your opinion about that object.  

4. Me parece que… – It seems to me that

Me parece que… is a polite and popular phrase that you can use to say your opinion in Spanish. Just like other phrases in this list, ‘me parece’, can be used in both informal and formal situations. This expression can be translated as:

  • It seems to me that
  • I think that

As you may have noticed, me parece que… works with indirect object pronouns. So if you want to adjust this phrase to share someone else’s opinion, you’ll need to change the pronouns. Additionally, you can conjugate ‘parecer’ to match any tense that you need. 

[Indirect object pronoun] + [parecer] + que + complement

Nos parece que Luisa fue muy grosera contigo
We think that Luis was very rude with you

Señor, con todo respeto, me parece que esa cartera es mía
Sir, with all due respect, I think that letter is mine

Me parece que podríamos haber elegido un color más agradable
It seems to me that we could have chosen a nicer color

Take Note: Like any other Spanish verbs, depending on the context, parecer may have different meanings. So be aware that this verb may not use all the time as a way to give your opinion. In this article, you can check how to use ‘parecer’ in Spanish

5. Desde mi punto de vista… – From where I’m standing

Desde mi punto de vista is a very polite way to give your opinion in Spanish. This expression can be used in both formal and informal situations. However, due to its politeness, speakers may use other phrases for casual situations. 

As a variation, in other Spanish-speaking countries, people may use bajo mi punto de vista. Both expressions are correct and depend on the speaker’s personal preference. They can be translated as:

  • From my point of view
  • From my perspective
  • In my view
  • From where I’m standing 

In order to use this expression to talk about another person’s opinion, you just have to change the possessive adjective. Here is the phrase structure you can use:

[Desde] + [possessive adjective] + punto de vista + [complement]

Desde nuestro punto de vista, es mejor que te disculpes con Paola
From our point of view, it’s better that you apologize to Paola

La verdad, desde mi punto de vista, debimos pedir indicaciones
To be honest, in our view, we should have asked for instructions

Desde su punto de vista, no vale la pena ir a ese restaurante
From her perspective, it’s not worth it to go to that restaurant 

6. Para mí… – To me

A very common way to say your opinion in a casual Spanish conversation is by using ‘Para mí’. Overall, this structure is more common in informal contexts with friends, family and acquaintances. So if you have to give your opinion in a formal conversation, I encourage you to use another expression from this list. 

Just like any other expressions, the elements that you use in your sentence will determine if you’re giving your opinion about an object or an action. Remember that for the first case you need to use a noun and for the second one, a verb.

Para + [prepositional pronoun or person] +  [complement]

Para mí, lo que hiciste fue una grosería 
To me, what you did was very rude

Para nosotros, el precio de los boletos fue razonable
To us, the price of the tickets was reasonable 

A mí no me gustó, pero para Laura y Elia, fue la mejor película del año
I didn’t like it, but to Laura and Elia, it was the best movie of the year

Related Resource: Spanish Prepositional Pronouns

7. Como yo lo veo – The way I see it

Como yo lo veo is another popular phrase that you can use to share your opinion in casual situations. As long as the speakers have a certain degree of familiarity between each other, this expression can be used in school or office environments. 

As you may imagine, como yo lo veo is conjugated for ‘Yo’. So if you want to adjust this phrase for other people, you’ll need to use the following phrase structure:

Como + [personal pronoun] + lo + [ver conjugated] + [complement]

No estoy segura, como yo lo veo, Judith tiene razón
I’m not sure, the way I see it, Judith is right

Como nosotros lo vemos, no tenías porqué ser tan grosero con Luisa
The way we see it, you didn’t need to be that rude with Luisa

Como yo lo veo, la nueva maestra es exigente, pero vamos a aprender más
The way I see it, the new teacher is strict, but we’ll learn more

8. Me da la impresión de que… – It seems like

Me da la impresión de que… is a very polite way to give your opinion in Spanish. This expression is appropriate for both informal and formal situations. However, if they’re close to the other speakers, people may use other phrases that are not as polite as this one. Me da la impresión can be translated as:

  • It seems like
  • I think
  • To get the impression that

You can use me da la impresión de que to share other people’s opinions. Below is the phrase structure that you can follow. Notice that ‘dar’ can be conjugated in different tenses, but it always needs to follow the third singular person conjugation. 

[Indirect object pronoun] + [dar conjugated] + la impresión 

Me da la impresión de que Candy es muy amable
I get the impression that Candy is very kind 

A Lisa le da la impresión que aprender español es fácil
Lisa thinks that Spanish is easy to learn

Nos da la impresión de que pueden hacer un mejor trabajo
We get the impression that you can do a better job

9. Se me hace que…- I think that

Se me hace que is another common and casual way to say your opinion in Spanish. Although it’s not disrespectful, this expression works better with friends, family and close acquaintances. So if you’re in a formal situation and need to give your opinion, you should use other expressions. 

In this context, se me hace que can be translated as ‘I think that’ and it can be used to give your opinion about an action or an object. Below is the phrase structure that you can with this phrase:

Se + [indirect object pronoun] + hace que + [complement]

La verdad, se nos hace que Linda y Jessica hablan demasiado
To be honest, we think that Linda and Jessica talk too much

Se me hace que este examen de español estuvo más difícil
I think that this Spanish test was more difficult 

Notice that this expression can work with other elements to emphasize your point of view or to introduce the people that are sharing their opinion.

A + [person or prepositional pronoun] + se + [indirect object pronoun] + hace que

A Laura se le hace que Julio es muy guapo
Laura thinks that Julio is very handsome

No entiendo por qué te cae mal, a mí Juan se me hace muy agradable
I don’t understand why you don’t like him, to me, Juan is very nice

Take Note: Se me hace que can be used in other contexts as a way to express uncertainty about something or to guess about the outcome of a situation. 

Wrapping Up

When learning a language, being able to give your opinion will allow you to interact with speakers in different situations. For that reason, in this article, we’ve presented you with 9 different ways that you can use to give an opinion in Spanish. 

All of these phrases can be used to share either yours or someone else’s opinion with some minor adjustments. Since some expressions may be more appropriate for certain situations, we also pointed out which expressions are better for formal and informal situations. 

Hopefully, now you have different expressions that you can use to say your opinion in Spanish. Good luck!

Daniela Sanchez

¡Hola! Soy Daniela Sanchez, I’ve taught Spanish in Mexico to a wide array of foreigners. From students and tourists to doctors and soldiers who’ve moved and visited here over the years. During the day I’m a freelancer and marketer, while at night I’m here writing for students of the world wide web looking to learn Spanish. I hope you find what you’re looking here during your journey into Español 🙂 Read More About Me

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