Dar Conjugation 101: Conjugate Dar in Spanish


Dar is one of the most common verbs you’ll use in Spanish. Since this verb has many irregularities, in this guide, you’ll learn how to conjugate ‘dar’. On top of the conjugation charts (which you’ll find below), I’ve also included examples and some common uses of this verb. 

Overview of Dar

Verb CharacteristicProperty
Verb Type-AR
IrregularYes
InfinitiveDar
Gerund (Present Participle) FormDando
Past Participle FormDado
SynonymsEntregar, proporcionar, provocar, regalar

Irregularities:

  • Present: doy (only ‘yo’), dais (vosotros)
  • Preterite: change of endings for all subjects (see preterite conjugations) 
  • Present Subjunctive: (yo, él, ella, usted), deis (vosotros)
  • Imperfect Subjunctive: die- (all subject pronouns)
  • Affirmative Imperative: (usted)
  • Negative Imperative: (usted), deis (vosotros)

Take Note: Dar is one of Spanish’s most common transitive verbs. Since a direct or indirect object must always follow it, dar usually works with direct and indirect object pronouns.

Indicative Conjugations of Dar

Present tense

In the present tense, the yo and vosotros forms of ‘dar’ are irregular. In this tense, dar is used to talk about things you give to people or emotions that something provokes in you. Las arañas me dan miedo.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoDoyI give
DasYou give
Él / Ella
Usted
DaHe/She gives
You (formal) give
NosotrosDamosWe give
VosotrosDaisYou give
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DanThey give
You (plural) give

Take Note: Notice that -oy is the same ending you use to conjugate the verb ser in the first person singular (yo).

Preterite tense

All the preterite forms of dar are irregular. The Spanish preterite refers to the objects you gave someone or the feelings that something provoked in you at a specific moment in the past. For example: mi mamá me dio este anillo.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoDiI gave
DisteYou gave
Él / Ella
Usted
DioHe/She gave
You (formal) gave
NosotrosDimosWe gave
VosotrosDisteisYou gave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DieronThey gave
You (plural) gave

Imperfect tense

 The imperfect tense is used to talk about objects people used to give you or to describe the feelings something caused you repeatedly in the past. For example, mi abuela nos daba muchos dulces. The imperfect conjugation of ‘dar’ is regular and can be translated as ‘used to give’ or ‘gave’.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoDabaI gave
I used to give
DabasYou gave
You used to give
Él / Ella
Usted
DabaHe/She gave
He/She used to give

You (formal) gave
You used to give
NosotrosDábamosWe gave
We used to give
VosotrosDabaisYou gave
You used to give
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DabanThey gave
They used to give

You (formal) gave
You (plural) used to give

Near future

 The near future in Spanish is used to talk about things you’ll give someone in the immediate future. This tense is formed with ir (present) + a + dar and can be translated as “going to give”.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoVoy a darI’m going to give
Vas a darYou’re going to give
Él / Ella
Usted
Va a darHe/She is going to give
You (formal) are going to give
NosotrosVamos a darWe’re going to give
VosotrosVais a darYou’re going to give
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Van a darThey’re going to give
You (plural) are going to give

Future simple tense

The simple future allows you to express that you will give something to someone at some point in the future. For example, te daré más dinero en unos días.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoDaréI will give
DarásYou will give
Él / Ella
Usted
DaráHe / She will give
You (formal) will give
NosotrosDaremosWe will give
VosotrosDaréisYou will give
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DaránThey will give
You (plural) will give

Conditional tense

 The conditional form of ‘dar’ conveys that someone would give something to another or that a situation would provoke a feeling in a person if certain circumstances are met. For example: ver esta película me daría mucho miedo. This tense is conjugated by adding the conditional endings to ‘dar’.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoDaríaI would give
DaríasYou would give
Él / Ella
Usted
DaríaHe/She would give
You would give
NosotrosDaríamosWe would give
VosotrosDaríaisYou would give
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DaríanThey would give
You (plural) would give

Present perfect tense

‘Dar’ in the present perfect tense expresses you would give something to someone in a moment close to the present. The formula to conjugate the present perfect tense in Spanish is haber (present tense) + dado.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHe dadoI have given
Has dadoYou have given
Él / Ella
Usted
Ha dadoHe/She has given
You have given
NosotrosHemos dadoWe have given
VosotrosHabéis dadoYou have given
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Han dadoThey have given
You (plural) have given

Past perfect

To conjugate to the past perfect tense, you need to use the imperfect form of haber + dado, which is the past participle form of ‘dar’. The past perfect of ‘dar’ expresses that you gave something to someone before some other reference point in the past. Pensé que ya te había dado tu celular.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHabía dadoI had given
Habías dadoYou had given
Él / Ella
Usted
Había dadoHe/She had given
You have given
NosotrosHabíamos dadoWe had given
VosotrosHabíais dadoYou had given
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Habían dadoThey had given
You (plural) had given

Future perfect

The future perfect of ‘dar’ is built by conjugating haber to the future tense and adding dado (the past participle of ‘dar’). In this tense, ‘dar’ communicates you will give something to someone by or before a certain time in the future.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHabré dadoI will have given
Habrás dadoYou will have given
Él / Ella
Usted
Habrá dadoHe/She will have given
You will have given
NosotrosHabremos dadoWe will have given
VosotrosHabréis dadoYou will have given
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Habrán dadoThey will have given
You (plural) will have given

Conditional perfect

‘Dar’ conjugated to the conditional perfect is used to talk about things you would have given or feelings you would have felt if a past condition was met. For example: si hubiera visto esa película, me habría dado mucho miedo.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHabría dadoI would have given
Habrías dadoYou would have given
Él / Ella
Usted
Habría dadoHe/She would have given
You would have given
NosotrosHabríamos dadoWe would have given
VosotrosHabríais dadoYou would have given
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Habrían dadoThey would have given
You (plural) would have given

Progressive tenses

The progressive tenses in Spanish refer to actions that are in progress at the moment of speaking. So, dar expresses that someone is giving something to another person at the moment of speaking. The structure to form these tenses is estar (conjugated) + gerund form of dar (dando).

Progressive TenseFormulaTranslation Example
PresentEstar (present) + dandoI am giving
PreteriteEstar (preterite) + dandoYou were giving
ImperfectEstar (imperfect) + dandoHe was giving
FutureEstar (future) + dandoWe will be giving
ConditionalEstar (conditional) + dandoThey would be giving
You (plural) would be giving

Dar Subjunctive Conjugations

Present subjunctive conjugation

In the present subjunctive, vosotros, yo, and él/ella have their own irregular conjugations, respectively. The present subjunctive of ‘dar’ is used to talk about the expectation or possibility of someone giving you something. For example: espero que tus amigos te den muchos regalos.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoI give
DesYou give
Él / Ella
Usted
He/She gives
You give
NosotrosDemosWe give
VosotrosDeisYou give
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DenThey give
You (plural) give

Take Note: Notice that the first and third-person singular forms (‘yo’, ‘él’, ‘ella’, and ‘usted’) have an acute accent. This accent is used to distinguish between the preposition de and the present subjunctive form of dar.

Present perfect subjunctive

Haber in the present subjunctive + dado is the structure you should use to build the present perfect subjunctive form of ‘dar’. The present perfect subjunctive of ‘dar’ is used to talk about wishes and probabilities. For example, no creo que le hayan dado su reloj.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHaya dadoI have given
Hayas dadoYou have given
Él / Ella
Usted
Haya dadoHe/She has given
NosotrosHayamos dadoWe have given
VosotrosHayáis dadoYou have given
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Hayan dadoThey have given
You (plural) have given

Imperfect subjunctive

We use the imperfect subjunctive of ‘dar’ to talk about what would happen if we gave something to someone. ¿Qué harías si te dieran dos millones de pesos?

The imperfect subjunctive has two conjugation models depending on which type of Spanish you’re using:

Latin American Spanish version

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoDieraI gave
DierasYou gave
Él / Ella
Usted
DieraHe/She gave
NosotrosDiéramosWe gave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DieranThey gave
You (plural) gave

Note: The table above doesn’t include the conjugation for vosotros because this pronoun is not used in Latin American Spanish.

Castilian Spanish version

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoDieseI gave
DiesesYou gave
Él / Ella
Usted
DieseHe/She gave
You gave
NosotrosDiésemosWe gave
VosotrosDieseis You gave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
DiesenThey gave
You (plural) gave

Past perfect subjunctive

The past perfect subjunctive of ‘dar’ can be used to talk about what would have happened if you had given something to someone. These hypothetical situations can no longer happen because their time has passed. For example si le hubiera dado las llaves…(If I had given him the keys).

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHubiera dadoI had given
Hubieras dadoYou had given
Él / Ella
Usted
Hubiera dadoHe/She had given
NosotrosHubiéramos dadoWe had given
You had given
VosotrosHubierais dadoYou had given
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Hubieran dadoThey had given
You (plural) had given

Dar Imperative Conjugations

The Spanish imperative mood is used to tell people what to do (affirmative commands) or what not to do (negative commands).

Affirmative commands

The affirmative imperative conjugation of dar is only irregular for the ‘usted’ form. The affirmative commands of dar command people to give something to someone. For instance: dame eso.

PersonConjugationTranslation
DaGive
UstedGive
VosotrosDadGive
UstedesDenGive

Negative commands

Since the Spanish negative imperative is based on the present subjunctive, dar is irregular when conjugating ‘usted’, ‘ustedes’, and ‘vosotros’. Negative commands allow you to order someone to not give something to another. For example: no le des dulces al bebé.

PersonConjugationTranslation
No desDon’t give
UstedNo déDon’t give
VosotrosNo deisDon’t give
UstedesNo denDon’t give

How to Use ‘Dar’ in Spanish

Now that you know all the conjugations of dar, you should check the sections below to check the uses of ‘dar’ in Spanish. 

As a synonym of ‘to give’, ‘hand’, or ‘donate’:

[Indirect object pronoun] + [dar conjugated]

¿Me das una papa, por favor?
Can you give me a chip, please?

La señora nos dio esta bolsa.
The lady gave us this bag.

To describe the emotions or feelings something causes you:

[Indirect object pronoun] + [dar conjugated] + [feeling]

De niña, me daban miedo las arañas.
When I was a kid, I used to be afraid of spiders.

Nos da gusto que te haya ido bien.
We are glad that everything went well.

Take Note: When referring to the feeling something causes you, dar follows the same conjugation pattern as ‘gustar’. Click here to learn more about verbs like ‘gustar’.

To talk about the subject a person teaches

Oigan, ¿quién les da español?
Hey, guys, who teaches you Spanish?

Ojalá Mr. Lee nos diera física.
I wish Mr. Lee taught us Physics.

Download Dar Conjugation Tables & Uses Cheat sheets

Download the PDF containing all of dar’s conjugation tables, verb characteristics, and uses so you can study it at your own pace!

Practice Quiz: Dar Conjugation

Take the dar conjugation quiz to practice your conjugation skills and see results for which tenses you’ve mastered and those that need work.

Daniela Sanchez

¡Hola! Soy Daniela Sanchez, I’ve taught Spanish in Mexico to a wide array of foreigners. From students and tourists to doctors and soldiers who’ve moved and visited here over the years. During the day I’m a freelancer and marketer, while at night I’m here writing for students of the world wide web looking to learn Spanish. I hope you find what you’re looking here during your journey into Español 🙂 Read More About Me

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