Salir Conjugation 101: Conjugate Salir in Spanish


‘Salir’ is one of the most common -IR verbs that you’ll use in Spanish. For that reason, this guide contains all the conjugations of salir. On top of providing you with conjugation charts, I’ve also included some examples of how to use this verb. Here is an overview of the topics you’ll learn:

Take Note: There are many tenses in Spanish. However, we don’t use them all. Many are simply old and outdated. As a result, in this guide, you’ll only learn the tenses you need to know to become fluent in Spanish. 

Overview of Salir

Verb CharacteristicProperty
Verb Type ‘-IR’.
IrregularYes
InfinitiveSalir
Gerund (Present Participle) FormSaliendo
Past Participle FormSalido
SynonymsIrse, marcharse, partir, surgir.  

Irregularities:

  • Present: salg (only ‘yo’)
  • Future & Conditional: saldr
  • Present Subjunctive: salg
  • Affirmative Imperative: sal / salg
  • Negative Imperative: salg

Take Note: Salir is the direct translation of ‘to leave’ or ‘to get out’. However, this verb can have additional meanings depending on the sentence and context.

Indicative Conjugations of Salir

Present tense

In the present tense, salir is irregular only in the ‘yo’ form. In other words, the form yo is conjugated with the stem ‘salg-’. In this tense, salir can be used to talk about the time someone leaves a place. For example, Cindy sale a las 8.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSalgoI leave
SalesYou leave
Él / Ella
Usted
SaleHe/She leaves
You (formal) leave
NosotrosSalimosWe leave
VosotrosSalísYou leave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SalenThey leave
You (plural) leave

Preterite tense

The Spanish preterite expresses that you left a place or went out with someone at a specific moment in the past. For instance, el sábado salí con Mindy.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSalíI left
SalisteYou left
Él / Ella
Usted
SalióHe/She left
You (formal) left
NosotrosSalimosWe left
VosotrosSalisteisYou left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SalieronThey left
You (plural) left

Imperfect tense

 The imperfect tense communicates the places you used to leave. For example, los domingos salíamos temprano. The imperfect form of salir can be translated as ‘used to leave’ or ‘left’.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSalíaI left 
I used to leave
SalíasYou left 
You used to leave
Él / Ella
Usted
SalíaHe/She left 
He/She used to leave

You (formal) left
You (formal) used to leave
NosotrosSalíamosWe left 
We used to leave
VosotrosSalíaisYou left 
You used to leave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SalíanThey left 
They used to leave

You (plural) left
You (plural) used to leave

Near future

 The near future in Spanish is used to talk about people you’re going out with or places you’ll leave in the immediate future. This tense is formed with ir (present) + a + salir and can be translated as “going to leave”.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoVoy a salirI’m going to leave
Vas a salirYou’re going to leave
Él / Ella
Usted
Va a salirHe/She is going to leave
You (formal) are going to leave
NosotrosVamos a salirWe’re going to leave
VosotrosVais a salirYou’re going to leave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Van a salirThey’re going to leave
You (plural) are going to leave

Future simple tense

All the future tense forms of ‘salir’ are irregular. To conjugate this tense, you must add the future endings to the irregular stem ‘saldr-’. The simple future allows you to express that you will go out with someone or leave a place at some point in the future. For example, creo que saldremos el lunes.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSaldréI will leave
SaldrásYou will leave
Él / Ella
Usted
SaldráHe/She will leave
You (formal) will leave
NosotrosSaldremosWe will leave
VosotrosSaldréisYou (formal) will leave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SaldránThey will leave
You (plural) will leave

Conditional tense

 Salir in the conditional tense is irregular. This tense is formed with the stem ‘saldr-’. The conditional of ‘salir’ conveys that someone would go out with another person or would leave a place if certain circumstances are met. For example: si fueras más amable, saldría contigo.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSaldríaI would leave
SaldríasYou would leave
Él / Ella
Usted
SaldríaHe/She would leave
You (formal) would leave
NosotrosSaldríamosWe would leave
VosotrosSaldríaisYou would leave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SaldríanThey would leave
You (plural) would leave

Present perfect tense

To form the Spanish present perfect, you should use the formula haber (present) + salido. In the present perfect tense, salir is used to talk about leaving a place or going out with someone in a moment close to the present. For example, todavía no he salido de la oficina.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHe salidoI have left
Has salidoYou have left
Él / Ella
Usted
Ha salidoHe/She has left
You (formal) have left
NosotrosHemos salidoWe have left
VosotrosHabéis salidoYou have left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Han salidoThey have left
You (plural) have left

Past perfect

To conjugate to the past perfect tense, you need to use the imperfect form of haber + salido, which is the past participle form of ‘salir’. The past perfect of ‘salir’ expresses that you left or went out with someone before some other reference point in the past. Cuando llegué, Sandra todavía no había salido.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHabía salidoI had left
Habías salidoYou had left
Él / Ella
Usted
Había salidoHe/She had left
You (formal) had left
NosotrosHabíamos salidoWe had left
VosotrosHabíais salidoYou had left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Habían salidoThey had left
You (plural) had left

Future perfect

Haber in future form + past participle of salir is the formula to conjugate the future perfect. With this tense, ‘salir’ communicates you will leave by or before a certain time in the future.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHabré salidoI will have left
Habrás salidoYou will have left
Él / Ella
Usted
Habrá salidoHe/She will have left
You (formal) will have left
NosotrosHabremos salidoWe will have left
VosotrosHabréis salidoYou will have left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Habrán salidoThey will have left
You (plural) will have left

Conditional perfect

‘Salir’ conjugated to the conditional perfect communicates that would have left somewhere or would have gone out with someone if a past condition was met. For example, si hubiera podido, habría salido más temprano.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHabría salidoI would have left
Habrías salidoYou would have left
Él / Ella
Usted
Habría salidoHe/She would have left
You (formal) would have left
NosotrosHabríamos salidoWe would have left
VosotrosHabríais salidoYou would have left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Habrían salidoThey would have left
You (plural) would have left

Progressive tenses

The Spanish progressive tenses describe actions in progress. The progressive forms of salir are formed with estar (conjugated) + present participle of salir (saliendo).

Progressive TenseFormulaTranslation Example
PresentEstar (present) + saliendoI am leaving
PreteriteEstar (preterite) + saliendoYou were leaving
ImperfectEstar (imperfect) + saliendoHe was leaving
FutureEstar (future) + saliendoWe will be leaving
ConditionalEstar (conditional) + saliendoThey would be leaving

Salir Subjunctive Conjugations

In Spanish, the subjunctive is used to talk about wishes, hypothetical situations or express uncertainty. The conjugation charts below show the subjunctive forms of salir. 

Present subjunctive

In the present subjunctive, salir is a verb with consonant changes. In other words, the present subjunctive of ‘salir’ uses the irregular stem ‘salg-’ . The present subjunctive of ‘salir’ is used to talk about the expectation or possibility of someone leaving or going out with someone. For example: ojalá hoy salgas más temprano. 

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSalgaI leave
SalgasYou leave
Él / Ella
Usted
SalganHe/She leaves
You (formal) leave
NosotrosSalgamosWe leave
VosotrosSalgáisYou leave
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SalganThey leave
You (plural) leave

Present perfect subjunctive

Haber in the present subjunctive + salido is the structure you should use to build the present perfect subjunctive form of ‘salir’. The present perfect subjunctive of ‘salir’ is used to talk about wishes and probabilities. For example, espero que todo haya salido bien.

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHaya salidoI have left
Hayas salidoYou have left
Él / Ella
Usted
Haya salidoHe/She has left
You (formal) have left
NosotrosHayamos salidoWe have left
VosotrosHayáis salidoYou have left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Hayan salidoThey have left
You (plural) have left

Imperfect subjunctive

We use the imperfect subjunctive of ‘salir’ to talk about what would happen if we left a place or went out with someone. This tense expresses wishes or hypothetical situations that are difficult to accomplish. Me gustaría que salieras conmigo. 

The imperfect subjunctive has two conjugation models depending on which type of Spanish you’re using:

Latin American Spanish version

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSalieraI left
SalierasYou left
Él / Ella
Usted
SalieraHe/She left
You (formal) left
NosotrosSaliéramosWe left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SalieranThey left
You (plural) left

Note: The table above doesn’t include the conjugation for vosotros because this pronoun is not used in Latin American Spanish.

Castilian Spanish version

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoSalieseI left
SaliesesYou left
Él / Ella
Usted
SalieseHe/She left
You (formal) left
NosotrosSaliésemosWe left
VosotrosSalieseisYou left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
SaliesenThey left
You (plural) left

Past perfect subjunctive

The past perfect subjunctive of ‘salir’ is used to talk about hypothetical situations in the past. In other words, things that can no longer happen because their time has passed. For example si hubiera salido temprano…(If I had left early).

PersonConjugationTranslation
YoHubiera salidoI had left
Hubieras salidoYou had left
Él / Ella
Usted
Hubiera salidoHe/She had left
You (formal) had left
NosotrosHubiéramos salidoWe had left
VosotrosHubierais salidoYou had left
Ellos / Ellas
Ustedes
Hubieran salidoThey had left
You (plural) had left

Salir Imperative Conjugations

The Spanish imperative is used to tell people what to do (affirmative commands) or what not to do (negative commands)

Affirmative commands

With the exception of ‘vosotros’, the affirmative commands of salir are irregular. The affirmative command of ‘tú’ is sal, ‘usted’ and ‘ustedes’ use the present subjunctive conjugations of ‘salir’. The imperative of salir can be used to ask people to leave a place. Salga de la oficina, señora.

PersonConjugationTranslation
SalLeave
UstedSalgaLeave
VosotrosSalidLeave
UstedesSalganLeave

Negative commands

Salir negative commands use the present subjunctive conjugations. This means that both formal and informal commands of salir are irregular. The negative imperative of salir is used to command people to not tell something to someone. For instance: no salgas con ella.

PersonConjugationTranslation
No salgasDon’t leave
UstedNo salgaDon’t leave
VosotrosNo salgáisDon’t leave
UstedesNo salganDon’t leave

Meanings of Salir & Examples

Now that you’ve studied the conjugation charts of ‘salir’, it’s time to learn how to use this verb. Although ‘salir’ means ‘to leave’, it has other applications: 

  • As a synonym of ‘to leave’ or ‘get out’

¡Sal de mi cuarto!
Get out of my room!

Ojalá saliéramos más temprano de la oficina. 
I wish we left the office earlier. 

  • Talking about dating or going out 

[‘Salir’ conjugated] + con + [person]

El sábado saldré con mis amigos. 
I’ll go out with my friends on Saturday. 

¿Estás saliendo con Paco?
Are you dating Paco?

  • Describing outcomes and results 

La operación salió bien. 
The surgery went well. 

  • Describing the origin or source of something

El agua estaba saliendo de aquí. 
The water was coming from here. 

Download Salir Conjugation Tables & Uses Cheat sheets

I’ve created a PDF for you to download containing all of the conjugation tables, characteristics, and uses of salir so you can study it at your own pace!

Practice Quiz: Salir Conjugation

Practice your ‘salir’ conjugation skills by taking the verb conjugation quiz! Choose any combination of tenses and whether or not you want to practice Latin American or Castilian Spanish.

Daniela Sanchez

¡Hola! Soy Daniela Sanchez, I’ve taught Spanish in Mexico to a wide array of foreigners. From students and tourists to doctors and soldiers who’ve moved and visited here over the years. During the day I’m a freelancer and marketer, while at night I’m here writing for students of the world wide web looking to learn Spanish. I hope you find what you’re looking here during your journey into Español 🙂 Read More About Me

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